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Thread: Block and tackle configurations

  1. #1
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    Block and tackle configurations

    Wasn't sure where to post this.

    It is a link to the different configurations to lift heavy objects, the different configurations demonstrate how much physical pulling weight is required to lift a 100 lb object.

    Maybe useful in a number of situtaions, but, check pulley specs first to avoid overloading accidents.

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/tra...ent/pulley.htm
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  2. #2
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    Oh how those tricky math teachers incorporated algebra into real like......

  3. #3
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    Ah yes, the magic of pulleys, hydraulics, and levers.
    You are right Dragon, make sure the specs are correct. One common mistake is to attach the pulleys to the ceiling with inadequate fasteners. Not a good thing
    I've never met a body of water I didn't like



  4. #4
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    A very handy resource to know but one thing I learned doing rope rescue is to be very aware of how easy it can be to overload the ropes once you start adding pulleys in.
    It might be easy to lift on your end, but the end holding the large weight could in fact be over the ropes safe working limit.

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  5. #5
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    Good points TH and Maine,

    Anchor points are often over looked, and certainly the rope specs. Have seen a few accidents when these are overlooked.
    It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.



    "Charles Darwin"

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